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Diabetes–What You Need to Know About This Hidden Danger

Diabetes–What You Need to Know About This Hidden Danger

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (sugar) for our bodies to burn to create energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, produces a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes large amounts of sugar to build up in your blood.
The actual cause of diabetes continues to be a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity appear to play major roles. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. According to the Center for Disease Control, diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. As of 2002, 18.2 million people in the U.S.–6.3 percent of the population–had diabetes, with 1.3 million new cases being diagnosed each year. The National Institutes of Health also estimate that an additional 5.2 million people have diabetes without actually being aware of it.
There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which was previously called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes, accounts for about 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, which was called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes, accounts for the remaining 90%. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that only pregnant women get. If not treated, it can cause problems for both the baby and the mother. Gestational diabetes develops in 2% to 5% of all pregnancies, but usually disappears when the pregnancy is over.
Diabetes is a serious disease and phrases such as “a touch of diabetes” or “your blood sugar is a little high” tend to dismiss the fact that diabetes is a major killer of Americans. In addition to the lives that are lost, diabetes has a tremendous economic impact in the United States. The National Diabetes Education Program estimates the cost of diabetes in 2002 was $132 billion. Of this amount, $92 billion was due to direct medical costs and $40 billion due to indirect costs such as lost workdays, restricted activity, and disability due to diabetes. The average medical expenditure for a person with diabetes was $13,243, or 5.2 times greater than the cost for a person without diabetes. In addition, 11 percent of national health care expenditures went to diabetes care.
In response to this growing health burden of diabetes, the diabetes community has three choices: prevent diabetes; cure diabetes; and improve the quality of care of people with diabetes to prevent devastating complications. All three approaches are being actively pursued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Many government agencies, at all levels, are involved in educational campaigns in an attempt to prevent diabetes, especially type 2. Several approaches to “cure” diabetes are also being pursued: pancreas transplantation, islet cell transplantation (islet cells in the pancreas produce insulin), the development of an artificial pancreas, and genetic manipulation where fat or muscle cells that do not normally make insulin have a human insulin gene inserted and are then transplanted into people with type 1 diabetes.
While there is yet no cure for diabetes, healthy eating, physical activity, and insulin injections are the basic therapies for type 1 diabetes. For those with type 2 diabetes, treatment includes healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Many people with type 2 may require oral medication to control their glucose levels. People with diabetes must take personal responsibility for their day-to-day care, and keep blood glucose levels from going too low or too high. The key to living a long and healthy life with diabetes is to learn about the disease, exercise daily, follow a diabetes food plan (right portions of healthy foods, less salt and fat), stop smoking, take prescribed medications, get routine medical care, brush your teeth and floss every day, monitor your blood glucose the way the doctor tells you to and remain positive. Using the correct routines, thousands of people with diabetes have lived long, happy and productive lives.

Career in Health Education

Career in Health Education


A career in health education is currently becoming one of the rapidly growing trends in today’s competitive job market.
Millions of people from different areas in the world are in fact considering a career in health education and that today thousands of health care institutions and schools are offering courses and classes for those who want to pursue a career in health education. Several surveys have revealed that as many as 100 occupational titles were opened for the students to consider and that number is just exclusive of physician, nurses and a handful of other careers.

Because of the myriad of career choices available in the health care industry, choosing the best career in health education is then a very important move to take. Perhaps the first most valuable way of choosing the right career is to get all the facts, including the descriptions of the given professions, especially the ones you are interested in.

So first of all, note that a career in health education will put you to an environment full of groups of people. You will be placed in a community setting, allowing you to determine the things that have a negative impact in the people’s health and lives, be it social or behavioral. In this way, a career in health education will give you the chance to serve as a catalyst to help empower the individual or the community to change whatever negative health aspects there is so to promote health and general well-being.

It is also a great move to know all the requirements needed for the health educators to meet. As maintained, it is expected from those who want to pursue a career in health education to have the ability to like and understand people of different personalities. A sense of optimism is also considered knowing that those who believe that people and society can change will no doubt succeed in their chosen field. Another important requirement in the health care industry is the commitment of the health educators to advocating the rights of the people and the community to make their own choices.

A career in health education is furthermore considered to let the students learn a series of skills which will enable them to assist the individuals and communities in achieving their specific aims of promoting health and well-being and at the same time reduce or prevent the risk of getting sick.

In general, a career in health education will give the students the chance to learn the proper ways of assessing the individuals and communities in their health education needs; how to plan effective health education programs; how to implement these programs; and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the health education programs offered. To top it all, a career in health education will provide the students the chance to facilitate groups in the best possible way.

Today, a career in health education is continually emerging as a central component of the health care industry. Several changes were made though, but the education is continually maintained to develop a line of health education experts who will help the community and individuals obtain a better health, a better life.

Types of Diabetes

Types of Diabetes

Before we start discussion about type of diabetes we must know what exactly is diabetes?
Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the digestion system of our body for growth and energy. Almost every food we eat broken down to glucose, the form or sugar which is the fuel for our body.
After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.
When we eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into our cells. For the people having diabetes this is the place of disorder, there pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced.
Types of diabetes: The three main types of diabetes are
Type 1 diabetes
Type 2 diabetes
Gestational diabetes
Type 1 Diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes)
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.
An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection stops in a part of body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live.
Type 2 Diabetes (previously known as non-insulin dependent diabetes)
The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes. Nearly 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2. This form of diabetes is strongly genetic. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight.
Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents. However, type 2 diabetes in youth are not in common.
When type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the pancreas is usually producing enough insulin, but for unknown reasons, the body cannot use the insulin effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. After several years, insulin production decreases. The result is the same as for type 1 diabetes—glucose builds up in the blood and the body cannot make efficient use of its main source of fuel.
Gestational Diabetes: (Gdm)
Gestational diabetes develops only during pregnancy. Like type 2 diabetes, it occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, and among women with a family history of diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 20 to 50 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 5 to 10 years.

Easy Guidelines on Fighting Food Allergy through Allergens-Free Diet

Easy Guidelines on Fighting Food Allergy through Allergens-Free Diet

Some people are not aware that they have food allergy. It can be difficult to diagnose especially if allergic reactions are not apparent before. Symptoms of food allergy only appear if you exceed the tolerable amount of foods you are allergic to.

Food allergy lets your body react as if some foods are harmful. The immune system of the body then creates antibodies for fighting back food allergens which triggers the food allergy. Once the person eats the food, touches the food, or even inhales its particles, chemicals including histamine are released by the body to protect it from allergens. Allergic symptoms can affect your cardiovascular system, skin, gastrointestinal tract, or respiratory system. Food allergy symptoms are characterized by wheezing, abdominal pain, swelling, itchiness in the throat, tongue, or lips, itchy skin rashes, and runny nose.

Food allergies need to follow special diets. These diets do not contain food allergens as much as possible. It is advised to consult your doctor or dietitian especially if you want to eliminate some types of food from your original diet or begin a specialized diet. It is because you might need some adjustments on the new meal plan or replace any lost nutrients by taking nutritional supplements.

1. Milk allergy diets. You need to eliminate milk and dairy products containing milk. These are good sources of Vitamin D and calcium. So it is necessary to replace it with other kinds of food such as soy products, spinach, and broccoli, also enriched with these nutrients. The labeled ingredients of the products must be always checked. You can also use almond, rice, or soy milk, instead of cow’s milk. Non-dairy goods which include some margarines, cheese, yogurt, chocolate, and ice cream.

2. Egg allergy diets. Young children, adults, and infants are more prone to egg allergies. Elimination of eggs and other products with egg contents is needed. Also check labels carefully because some egg alternatives has egg white contents.

3. Peanut allergy diets. Peanut allergies are one of the most fatal and are potentially serious among all types of food allergies. It contains food allergens most common for triggering allergic reactions. Most commercial foods such as ethnic foods, candy, and baked foods contain peanuts, especially if prepared only by one manufacturer.

4. Tree nuts allergy diets. All products with tree nuts ingredients must be totally avoided even though only one nut triggers your allergic reactions. Some shampoos and lotions also contain tree nuts. Carefully check the product labels.

5. Fish allergy diet. Fish have different species but contains similar proteins. You need to eliminate all kinds of fish from your diet, except if your allergist has already determined the specie that triggers your food allergy. It is also advisable not to visit seafood restaurants.

6. Shellfish allergy diets. Shellfish have different species but contains similar proteins. You need to eliminate all kinds of shellfish from your diet, except if your allergist has already determined the specie that triggers your food allergy.

7. Soy allergy diets. Soybeans are considered legumes which include kidney beans, navy beans, black beans, string beans, chickpeas, pinto beans, peanuts, carob, licorice, and lentils. This is widely used for processing foods, so make sure to avoid such products.

8. Wheat allergy diets. Wheat proteins are called gluten and wheat made foods are considered as American diet staples, which you need to avoid. Read the labels of the products carefully.

Never forget these diet guidelines to fight food allergies successfully. After all nothing beats caution and preparedness.

All About Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Types.

All About Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Types.

While talking about diabetes, you may be frightened from the idea that you may have it. Or maybe, you may have it in the future. You want to know if you are at risk to develop diabetes and anxiously you’re looking to find if you have any diabetes symptom.

Diabetes affects the manner in which the body handles carbohydrates, fats and proteins. If neglected, diabetes can have serious complications. The diabetic people have high blood sugar level. The blood sugar level is regulated by insulin – a hormone produced by the pancreas, which depends on your eating habits.

Diabetes is a serious disease. But the startling truth is that diabetes is reversible. Diabetes is the number one cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This disease is a condition where the body is unable to automatically regulate blood glucose levels, resulting in too much glucose (a sugar) in the blood. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects as many as 16 million Americans.

Actually, there is no clear symptom for diabetes. The most common symptoms of diabetes are as follow:

– being all the time thirsty
– frequent urination
– increased hunger
– feeling all the time tired; having an excessive fatigue,

On the other hand, there are some other symptoms of diabetes that are prescribed as diabetes complications in fact. These symptoms are:

– vision changes;
– recurrent skin infections very difficult to heal;
– tingling or numbness you may feel in your extremities;
– gums disorders;
– Hair loss and many others.

There are two different types of diabetes.

Type I Diabetes (juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes): The reason for type I diabetes is due to pancreas unability to produce insulin.

Type II Diabetes (non insulin dependent diabetes or adult onset diabetes): This diabetes is a result of body tissues becoming resistant to insulin. It is usually hereditary.

Type 2 Diabetes is more common than Type 1 Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a life-long disease marked by high levels of sugar in the blood. Conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Type 2 diabetes may account for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Up to two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Obesity is the single most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. An estimated 20% of all cases of new onset type 2 diabetes are in individuals between the ages of 9-19. The more you know about type 2 diabetes, the more you’ll be able to take the right steps to take control of your condition.

If neglected, diabetes can lead to various complications such as damage to the kidneys, heart disease, nerve damage, hypoglycemia (drastic reduction in glucose levels). Diabetes is a serious disease and there is no treatment of it. However, it can be brought under control by proper diabet diet.